The 3 Major Flaws of LoRaWAN

LoRaWAN has three undeniable flaws

  1. Nearly all uplink messages are unacknowledged (you won’t know if the message was ever successfully delivered)
  2. All gateways in range see all uplink traffic (not safe)
  3. LoRaWAN requires an enormous amount of bandwidth (tough to scale, culprit for ISM band traffic, subject to interference from other LoRaWAN gateways)

 

1. Nearly all uplink messages are unacknowledged

LoRaWAN has 1% Duty Cycle Limit for both end devices and the gateway (A duty cycle is the fraction of one period in which a signal or system is active. A period is the time it takes for a signal to complete an on-and-off cycle) In order to support the 1% duty cycle limitation for the gateway, all uplink messages are unacknowledged and uncoordinated, LoRaWAN is considered a “pure-aloha” scheme.

What is pure-aloha: “The idea is applicable to systems in which uncoordinated users are competing for a single channel (shared resource). ALOHA permits users to transmit any time they feel like. Collisions will occur and therefore colliding frames will be destroyed. However, if feedback is available on the destruction, then users will be made aware of their frames have not been transmitted (received) successfully  (1)

“Such a network has about 18% efficiency. This means that 82% of packets are lost when a LoRaWAN network is fully utilized. Since most messages are unacknowledged, the end node does not know its message was missed”(2). The Things Network also confirms this statement by stating “the capacity for downlink messages is even lower than for uplink messages, so don’t waste it.”

2. All gateways in range see all uplink traffic (not safe)

No explanation required.

3. LoRaWAN requires an enormous amount of bandwidth

see my previous post: LORA vs. Sigfox vs. Weightless-P

Sources:

1: Notes on the efficiency of ALOHA: http://www.csee.umbc.edu/~chettri/cs481/notes/NotesOnTheEfficiencyOfALOHA.pdf

2.Link Labs Blog: https://www.link-labs.com/use-cases-and-considerations-for-lorawan/

3. https://iotee.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/lpwan-technology-comparison/

 

LoRaWAN vs. Sigfox vs. Weightless-P: Simulation Results in the “Real World”

In wireless communication, the Hata Model for urban areas, also known as the Okumura–Hata model for being a developed version of the Okumura model, is the most widely used radio frequency propagation model for predicting the behaviour of cellular transmissions in built up areas. This model incorporates the graphical information from Okumura model and develops it further to realize the effects of diffraction, reflection and scattering caused by city structures. This model also has two more varieties for transmission in suburban areas and open areas. (source: Wikipedia)

The Hata Model simulation was conducted for Sigfox, LORA, and Weightless-P with the base station height set at 30m and the end devices heights set at 0.5m. The following simulation was conducted at Ubiik (hardware developers for Weightless-P) but we have checked their math and our team has confirmed the numbers are accurate and unbiased.

Let’s first take a look at the U.S Results (902-928MHz)US compaire.png

 

US2 9.54.52 AM.pngUS3.pngUS 1.png

Now let’s take a look at the results in Europe (863-870MHz). The only difference is LORA is only able to use a smaller bandwidth.

EUR compaire.pngEUR1.pngEUR 2.pngEUR 3.png

 

Let’s see what these numbers mean for an actual Smart Metering deployment (click here)

(If you would like to contribute/make edits/suggestions please contact us at techgu.rooh@gmail.com)

sources: (http://www.ubiik.com/lpwan-comparisons)