Internet of Things Wireless Connectivity Option: Wi-Fi Pros and Cons

Wifi-Hotspots
Today one of the most common connectivity technologies for consumer products is Wi-Fi, whose 802.11b/g flavors are using the license-free 2.4 GHz frequency band. A Wi-Fi access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a slightly greater range outdoors. Wi-Fi has the benefit of a large spectrum allowing high data rates, 54 Mbps and still increasing with 802.11n and 802.11ac, in a license-free frequency band that is almost harmonized worldwide1 [17]. Wi-Fi has been widely adopted and it is a great way to provide wireless broadband internet access. However, Wi-Fi is designed for high data rates needed for multimedia contents, as opposed to many IoT applications. There has been some effort to promote low-power Wi-Fi; however, it remains an order of magnitude hungrier than what battery-powered devices in IoT application can afford such as battery powered sensors. In short, Wi-Fi is not a suitable candidate for many IoT applications. It is overkill on the data rate for most applications and an absolute power guzzler.  Wi-Fi is likely to remain the major smartphone and Internet connectivity medium. One can envision that the IoT network gateway would be embedded in the Wi-Fi hub already present in most homes, commercial spaces, factories, and offices.

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